Canine Cancer

 

 

Some of these Videos and Photos are Graphic

This is an ongoing project, please, keep checking back for more content.

 

 

This portion of the website is devoted to canine cancer. These are graphic images of the canid. Please be aware of this as you visit this portion of the site.

Mouth Cancer: Gingiva Squamous Cell Carcinoma

 

 

Gingiva Squamous Cell Carcinoma is the most common mouth cancer. Mouth cancer tumors grow rapidly. They invade nearby bone and tissue. They however do not usually spread to other organs. They occur most often in older dogs. Symptoms include enlarged lymph nodes, malformed facial appearance, blood in the mouth, weight loss, bad breath, problems chewing, losse teeth, and drooling.

Western treatment includes lymph node cytology, three-view thoracic radiographs,and biopsy. Surgery is the first course of treatment. "A radiation protocol using 4 Gy per fraction for a total of 48 Gy for macroscopic squamous cell carcinoma in 39 dogs provided reasonable local control, without complete remission, with a median progression-free survival of 36 months." Chemotherapy studies show survival rates of three to nine months. Tumor vaccines containing human glycoprotein 100 expressed a reduction in tumor size from 17% to 35% and vaccines with human tyrosinase plasmid DNA expressed a survival span of thirteen months.

 

Mouth Cancer: Oral Melanoma

 

Oral melanoma is commonly found in the gingiva or the buccal mucosa. It can also occur in the labial mucosa, palate, and dorsal surface of the tongue. Oral melanomas are locally aggressive. They can metastasis to distant locations, including regional lymph nodes. Symptoms are similar to Gingiva Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Western treatment includes lymph node cytology, three-view thoracic radiographs,and biopsy. Surgery is the first course of treatment. With radiation therapy, there are three risk factors that affect the prognosis, whether the tumor location is rostral or caudal, whether there is a large amount of disease or small, or whether the disease has affected the bone.Dogs with non of these risks live an average of 21 months after treatment. Survival decreases as the above is involved. Chemotherapy is ineffective. Tumor vaccines (see Gingiva Squamous Cell Carcinoma)

 

 

Mouth Cancer: Oral Fibrosarcoma

 

 

Fibrosarcomas are tumors of the maxilla and mandilbe bones. They normally remain localized with a low metastatic rate. There is, however, an aggressive variant that looks benign histologically but is very aggressive. This fast growing type is referred to as histologically low-grade but biologically high-grade fibrosarcoma. Symptoms are similar to Gingiva Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Melanoma.

Western treatment includes lymph node cytology, three-view thoracic radiographs,and biopsy. Surgery is the first course of treatment. Radiation is consider ineffective. Fibrosarcoma are chemotherapy resistance.

 

 

 

 

If there are any cancers we have not covered let us know.

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